Tag Archives: Crime

4th July – James Patterson

Well hello Women’s Murder Club! It’s been a while! I started this blog with my passion for the genre of Crime and it has changed with me as I have gone deeper down the YA Fantasy genre. But with this Covid-19 lock down I have found myself reading a lot more and re-read all of the Women’s Murder Club books I already have (1-11) and then I bought the next 4, nearly catching up to the 19 that are out. I figured I would continue the series review I was up to!

Plot

We find ourselves with a WMC without Jill, we are a woman down. I went into this book wondering how we would cope without Jill and Patterson doesn’t leave it long!

Lindsay is out with her friend’s at the club house of Susie’s, drinking a margarita whilst off duty, when Jacobi comes in and tells her that a case they have been working on might break. They go off together, Lindsay fully disclosing the couple of drinks she has had to Jacobi and off they go to conduct some surveillance. A car they have been looking for for months is in sight and all of a sudden they are in a high speed car chase across the city. The car crashes and Lindsay and Jacobi approach the car, guns drawn. Seeing that the drivers were a young teenage girl and boy and they were clearly in distress, with blood and vomit everywhere, the two cops holster their weapons and approach the car to give aid. Getting the kids out of the car, the lad shoots Jacobi and then when he is down, kicks him in the head. Lindsay pulls out her gun but not quick enough as she is also shot and on the ground. Before the kids can pull the lethal shot, Lindsay shoots them, killing the girl and paralysing the boy.

One would assume that after a police investigation, which Lindsay is cleared from, that would be the end. The evidence points to the young siblings as serial killers of the city’s forgotten. However, the young pair are part of a wealthy family and their father sues Lindsay for police malpractice, meaning Lindsay has to fight for her career in a court of law.

With all the media attention, Lindsay escapes to a sleepy village in California, house sitting for her sister to avoid the attention. This is actually the scene of Lindsay’s first ever homicide, one she never solved. Whilst trying to keep her nose clean, she begins to dive into the new homicide’s that are occuring in the village that seem suspiciously like the now cold case of hers.

Fighting on two fronts, can Lindsay clear her name and clear the sleepy village of a vicious killer?

Opinion

I kept hinting in the other 3 reviews that one of these books got a 10 and although I can’t quite remember which one it was for me back then, having re-read them all recently, it is definitely this one. Police brutality, especially in America, is rife and the apparent obvious racism that comes with it needs to be eradicated. However, this book shows just how perilous a police officer’s job is and that fine line and split second decision making they have to do on a daily basis. As a UK audience member, police shootings are very rare here as our normal police cannot carry a gun. We have had a few taser incidents which have resulted in deaths but rarely is it a gun shooting. I was fully behind Lindsay on this case and believe she was in the right to do as she did so it was interesting to see how money can play a big part as if the family had no money, you can be sure that there would have been no law suite, whether it be warranted or not. This case brought into the lives of the WMC the newest lawyer to replace the space left by Jill. Yuki is a delight and is also very different to Jill.

The second story line I thought was also excellent. With Lindsay making friends in the area but also managing to find herself in the middle, and eventually in the centre, of a serial killer case. Some people cannot leave the job at home! I thought the case was well done and the twist was excellent.

I have already given my rating away but here it is: 10/10. 

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Willoughby Book Club – Review

I am sure there are many book clubs across the world but at Christmas 2019, my other half bought me a 3 month book subscription to Willoughby Book Club. 3 free books sent to me via the post – what is not to love as a book lover? I thought I would give it a little review!

How it works

I figured I couldn’t do a ‘plot’ section here this time! So how it works? For us as this was a gift, I received a metal box and inside were a bookmark, sticker and some instructions on how to fulfill my gift. I went to their site, chose the ‘bundle’ I wanted (in this case I chose contemporary fiction) and then you filled in a little information about your usual reads and favourite authors etc. As I had a gift, I put in the gift code at checkout and it was free. As this was a gift for Christmas, receiving it on 25th December meant I was too late to get the first book in January (cut off is around 20th of the month for the following month) so I had to wait until February to receive my first book. This one was Ink and Bone, March’s book was Between the Blade and the Heart and this month was The Vanishing Season. I’m not going to really go into too much detail about each book but I did enjoy all three and I doubt I would have picked them up off the shelf in a bookshop so that ticks off two massive criteria for me in a book subscription service. Two were crime and 1 was a fantasy, both genres I said I liked in the information section. The first one was actually a little of both – a supernatural crime solving.

Opinion

As I said above, I did like the books sent and I wouldn’t have picked them myself. I found the ordering of it slightly confusing – I had to act like I was buying it for myself which meant I found out the cost of the gift. Maybe if they had a page on their website which says “gift card” and you can go through the procedure without seeing the prices? Then still fill in the coupon code at the end so they know you do really have a gift?

In the information box about my interests etc, I mentioned authors PJ Tracy and JoJo Moyes as well as book series Women’s Murder Club and Rizzoli and Isles as well as Fantasy books such as Ash Princess and Richelle Mead’s books. I went for contemporary (in this case books that are 5 years and younger) as I would rather read books that are recently out that I can delve into a new author as well as the fact it would be a greater case of not having read the book either. I am pleased that they didn’t send me any books of the authors I mentioned because that would have been a bit of a cop out for suggesting new reads for me. I think the selection was bang on with what I suggested and maybe the fact that I didn’t get the generic fiction title (with mentioning JoJo Moyes) would be because I only had 3 months – a few more months and who knows what else I would have gotten?

It was slightly disappointing that I couldn’t get my first book in January. I don’t know how many gift subscriptions they do get compared to how many people order this for themselves, and I do understand that they basically ship everything out all at once so they can spend the time taking delivery of the books and individually wrapping them for all the subscribers but I’d have thought maybe January they could look at doing a bit later so you can get it from an Xmas gift. Though all being said, with this Covid-19 issue, I was quite glad to get 2 books in lockdown! So it was a blessing in disguise that I had to wait a month!

The price ranges from £39.99-£49.99 for a 3 month subscription, depending on genre, and if you take into consideration a £7.99 book (which I am sure they get 40%+ discount on them) plus postage, it works out at around £13 a month for a book. Slightly steeper than you would pay if you went into a bookshop but they are employing people to look at your information and make personal recommendations for you and then wrap and ship the books. Not too bad a service and especially doable as a gift for those in your life who love to read.

I’d definitely recommend this to give as a gift for someone and for me, I think I would prefer to pay per month for the subscription rather than in one go for me to take it up not as a gift. The recommendations were great though and I don’t think the price is bad for what you get. A very solid 8/10.

 

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Filed under Book Review, JoJo Moyes, Richelle Mead, Rizzoli and Isles, Women's Murder Club

The Geneva Decision – Seeley James

Screenshot_2015-03-23-11-38-34For those of you in the publishing world, in a few weeks we have the Bologna Book Fair! With my MA course, I am able to go to Bologna for free (well free as long as you don’t count the course fee!). So hopefully I will have something fun to report when I get back. Who knows, maybe I’ll see you there!

This book today was found, once again, via BookBub. For those not subscribed to BookBub, go for it! It’s a great way to discover new titles and genres!

Plot

We meet our protagonist, Pia Sabel, right from the get go. An ex Olympic soccer player (or football if your English!), she becomes the boss of her adoptive father’s security company. Apparently Pia had a rather traumatic first few years, where she saw her mother and father murdered and threatened to be killed herself. Luckily, her adopted dad had a bit of money to be able to employ body guards and decided to start up his own security company to help Pia.

Pia is out on a ‘job’ and spots a shady guy. Following him, she sees him shoot her potential employer. After she tackles him and hands him over to the police, we see that he has an accomplice. The police blunder and the assassin escapes, plunging Pia and Sabel security into the shady world of bankers and assassins. A journey that takes her from Switzerland to Colombia and back to continental Europe, rookie Pia makes mistakes, friends, loyalty and respect in her new playing field.

Opinion

Enjoyment wise, this was a great book. Pia was a relatable character. She had been moddle-coddled by her over-protective father all her life. Even when she was on a soccer tour, she had her own security. The two agents with her show how inexperienced Pia in the spy game and the derision showed by some of the team is one that is very believable in a male orientated world.

The problem for me with this book was the level of disbelief. How does an olympic soccer player know what an assassin looks like from his demeanor on her first case out? I’d expect James Bond, a secret service spy and ex-officer in the Navy to be able to but not Pia. Her ability to incapacitate the assassin is slightly ridiculous, when again, she has no ‘spy’ experience. The fact that Pia is the leader of her group is just asking for her to die. Yes she is the owner of the company but relying on the experience of other people is more believable, and when she is seen to have promoted someone for this specific role, she still ignores them. Why would someone who wasn’t the best shot, is a rookie and no ability to decide if a situation is too dangerous lead a team to potential slavers?

If it wasn’t for these problems, this book would easily be an 8 or 9. However, due to my inability to believe some of the situations, my verdict is 6/10. Worth a read but just lacking a decent editor.suicide-tourism

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The Sinner – Tess Gerritsen

I have recently browsed over my old posts and noticed something amiss. I have only 7 posts in the crime category. This was surely not right so I double checked. But no, only 7 posts. Yet I have read more than that in my lifetime so today I shall be rectifying this problem, starting with the re-reading of Rizzoli and Isles series. For those of you who have seen the rise of this blog from its humble beginnings (and still humble present) may have noticed that I declared this blog to be more of a crime book review site. Obviously, in the past two years this has not been the case so I shall crack on with the 3rd in Gerritsen’s series, The Sinner.

Plot

We start of with a man. A man in a taxi. Not much else is known except for the fact that he is making the taxi go onto a dirt track. The taxi driver seems reluctant to carry on and tells the man that he is now walking to his destination. A seemingly natural thing for a taxi man to do who is trying to save the underside of his car. However, this destination seems to have brought on terror for the taxi man and as our man leaves to head off into the wilderness, we can only hope for the best. As it is, this hope is truly shattered when we see him taking pictures of an area that has seen devastation.

Enter into present day and we find Dr. Maura Isles working on a post-mortem of a man who seemingly died from a heart attack. During this, Detective Jane Rizzoli calls, meaning one thing; a body has been found. Isles journeys to a convent where we find a nun has been murdered and another is in need of quick medical care.

We later discover that the dead nun had given birth to a still born and that the other nun is currently fighting for her life. It seems to be apparent who the intended target was, the father of this still born being the obvious murderer. However, we discover that the nun in the hospital had been previously working overseas in a leprosy village and it had been massacred.

Isles is called to another murder, seemingly not connected and finds a lady whose hands, feet and face had been taken away. A horrific murder. The type of bullet used on the ‘Rat Lady’ results in the FBI getting involved and once again Agent Dean is back in Boston, with a now pregnant Rizzoli.

Isles’ ex-husband, Victor, arrives back into her life and she ends up falling back into her adulterous husbands arms. However, she seems to have an attraction to the unattainable priest who is involved in the convent case.

Rizzoli and Isles piece together this mystery and we end up with Isles fighting for her life.

Opinion

I love these books. I have to really separate them from the TV series but little things connect them. It is amazing how many names and characters are used throughout both types of entertainment. My bias aside, this is a great book. The title is excellently chosen as nearly everyone is this book can be accused of Sinning amongst its pages.

The plot is fantastically woven and no question left unanswered. Rizzoli and Isles are fantastic characters who seem to be developing into friends as well as work colleagues, hopefully leaving it open to some great, off the case banter (or am I just hoping for the TV banter?).

Having said that, I do find the whole storyline of a policewoman and FBI Agent romance to be a little old school. Hopefully Gerritsen brings back the priest because that would cause an excellent upset for Isles. I also think it strange that a priest be brought into this series when there is a priest in 2nd Chance too. I know that I could be reading too much into them but as Angie Harmon has acted as both the lead detectives in both TV series’ I almost put these books together.

My verdict 8.5/10: All in all a great read and I cannot wait to read the next one!

Lindsey Boxer                            Jane Rizzoli

 

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Filed under Book Review, Crime, Rizzoli and Isles